An 18-wheeler moves into the lane next to yours on the freeway, and you happen to notice that the tires are going bald. Otherwise, the truck looks to be in good condition.

When the big rig begins to drift in your direction, you begin to worry. Traffic is hemming you and a sideswipe collision seems inevitable. Is the driver not paying attention?

Overloaded cargo

Both state and federal regulations prohibit the overloading of a commercial vehicle like an 18-wheeler, but that does not stop a trucking company from allowing the practice. At the very least, the company might look the other way while cargo-stuffing goes on: After all, more cargo delivered means more profit for the trucking concern. Overloaded cargo will cause the truck to be off balance. During a sudden turn or lane change, the added cargo increases the risk of a rollover or other kind of accident.

Maintenance problems

When you see worn tires on a big rig, the cause could very well be overloading. Due to the added weight, tires will run hotter and wear out faster than they should. It will also adversely affect brakes and other equipment, and the trucking company will find that they need to replace expensive component parts sooner than later.

Lack of training

Trucking companies should always train new drivers well on proper loading practices to avoid situations in which they might pose a danger to other drivers and create the scenario for a crash. If you are injured in a truck-car accident, lack of training may be a factor included in the case a personal injury attorney puts together for you.

Assigning liability

If the truck in the lane next to you is overloaded, the cargo may shift and the driver might lose control—to your detriment. An attorney experienced with assisting people who suffer injuries in a truck-car crash knows how trucking companies and their insurers work in trying to reduce the size of any settlement they owe you. Overloading a big rig is a serious legal matter and opens the possibility for third-party liability for multiple parties and not just the trucking company.